Category Archives: Other

Stuffed Baby Ostrich souvenirs in South Africa a big No-No

Stuffed baby Ostriches sold as souvenirs
Stuffed baby Ostriches sold as souvenirs

Early November I posted this picture on our FB page. Baby Ostriches sited at local main road Plettenberg Bay market (South Africa) being sold as gruesome souvenirs. The post attracted some attention.

One of our favourite animal activists Sue Randall wanted to take this further. Under our banner Sue wrote the following letter, which we posted on a few sites relating to Plettenberg Bay and the South African Garden Route. The posts were removed.

However, the letter cannot be removed from this site.

To whom it may concern

Recently on Facebook, I saw some photos of items that are being sold at the “Market on Main” in Plettenberg Bay. I was horrified. These items consist of little dead ostrich chicks, preserved by taxidermy. Each dead baby bird is sitting in an open half of an ostrich egg.

Baby birds – of any species – are a symbol of new life and ecological diversity. A dead baby bird is a sad thing, especially when it’s so obviously been killed by human hands and preserved for sale as an ornament. To see a tiny, helpless creature that has been killed so soon after hatching, and has then been pushed back into an eggshell from its own species, is plain bizarre. It makes a grisly trinket.

I, and many others who saw the photos on Facebook and commented on them, find these “ornaments” most offensive and unattractive.

Allowing the sale of these macabre trinkets ruins the quiet and gentle nature of a coastal town such as Plett. Although such sale is not illegal, it is both unethical and unnecessary. Africa has so much more beauty to offer than this. Our animals and birds should be cherished alive, not butchered and abused. I don’t think it creates a good impression for tourists.

I strongly encourage the organisers of Market on Main to relook at their policy about what items should be allowed for sale, and why.

Regards

Sue Randall

On behalf of Chickens as Pets not food – Chicken Rescue and Rehabilitation

Johannesburg

 

 

 

Plea to those considering using live chickens in Kaparot

If you are partaking in Kaparot using live chickens, consider this: for thousands of years the Jewish people have been persecuted, often begging for the freedom to live. As the persecutor of that chicken, look into her eyes and know that she too is begging for her life.
Celebrate Kaparot 2015 by choosing the alternative humane option of monetary donation. Live the New Year with dignity.

Please feel free to share this post to increase awareness.

  
 

Ashas recovery

4 months ago Korlia Schmidt who operates out George branch of Chicken Rescue and Rehabilitation SA rescued a mom and 7 chicks that were in trouble. 

Mom and chicks have prospered in this protected environment. Just over ago, Asha (one of the chicks) suddenly developed splaying legs and  lameness. 

See video below   

The vet wasn’t entirely sure what was up but after some observation time felt it was mechanical damage from an injury.

Asha was put onto a strong anti inflammatory and bed rest. We added vitamin B complex and the homeopathic remedy  ‘opium’ which we have had huge success with before for spinal injury. Opium was suggested for use by our talented and experienced homeopath here in Johannesburg. 

A week on and look at Ashas progress. Well done Korlia. O

Experiments on chickens conducted at Chickens as pets not food – Chicken Rescue and Rehabilitation South Africa

Its true! We have been conducting an experiment of our own here at Chicken Rescue and Rehabilitation South Africa on our dear ex batt Claire.

It all started with a rescue in February, when we picked up some very bruised and battered ex batts. Grace, had severe neurological damage after been hit against the side of a metal cage, and went onto a regime of homeopathic nerve support, as well as a well needed vitamin B injection. Vitamin B is also excellent in the support of neuro damage. Graces neurological , mis-firings slowly healed, but I noticed something else. Grace, had new feathers, and within a few short weeks, despite her compromised body, she was developing and growing the most exquisite new feathers – faster than I had ever seen a compromised ex batt cover. I could only attribute it to the vit B injection, but decided that we needed to start some trials of our own.

This is where Claire enters the picture. Claire has been with us for over a year, and has never managed to develop enough feathers to cover her shoulders and back, despite a multi vitamin and good food. Claire has always had poor feather development. As winter was around the corner, and I didn’t want Claire to suffer the cold another year, I started Claire on a B complex. I elected not to inject this time, as I was warned it is a very sore injection.

I bought a good quality B complex from my local pharmacy in capsule form. The first two weeks I gave Claire 1/4 of a capsule daily. I sprinkled the powder into a piece of bread, closed the bread around the powder and made it into a tight ball, which I popped down her throat. After two weeks, I sprinkled 2 x vit B capsules (for 11 chickens) over their food aprox 5 x a week. This was started on the 27th March 2015, and this article was written on the 31st May 2015 – 2 months later.

The results have been very pleasing. All the flock seem to have really grown some great feathers, and Claire in particular has finally grown some shoulder and back feathers, where I thought we would never see feathers again. A possible added benefit, is that both Claire and Ruby where having repeated ‘egg bound’ issues up until I started the vit B. I cannot attribute the evaporation of the egg issues to the vit B for sure, but it does seem rather a coincidence.

I will continue to watch and monitor our flock on the Vit B complex, and will continue to try this on newly rescued hens and document the results. I know one trial is not going to be enough for some of you scientists out there, but its enough for me to feel confident to share this far.

Join our FB page https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chickens-as-pets-not-food-Chicken-Rescue-and-Rehabilitation/101165646600196

27th march 2015
27th march 2015
27th march 2015
27th march 2015
15th April 2015
15th April 2015
15th April 2015
15th April 2015
15th April 2015
15th April 2015
15th April 2015
15th April 2015
27th April 2015
27th April 2015
27 April 2015
27 April 2015
31 May 2015
31 May 2015
31 May 2015
31 May 2015

Thank you thank you thank you for you contribution to this important awareness campaign

Our first broiler rescued a few years ago (genetically modified meat chicken). His name was Bello and he grew to 8.5 kgs in an alarmingly short time, eventually no longer able to support his own weight, we had to euthanase. I will never forget my first broiler heartbreak, and I could not have predicted how many times my heart would be broken again by a dear sweet broiler. Genetically modified to go from 0 to slaughter in 6 weeks, these noble birds are reduced to eating machines, experiencing the pain and discomfort of accelerated growth, and slaughtered while still babies. This is the reality of the meat industry.
Our first broiler rescued a few years ago (genetically modified meat chicken). His name was Bello and he grew to 8.5 kgs in an alarmingly short time, eventually no longer able to support his own weight, we had to euthanase. I will never forget my first broiler heartbreak, and I could not have predicted how many times my heart would be broken again by a dear sweet broiler. Genetically modified to go from 0 to slaughter in 6 weeks, these noble birds are reduced to eating machines, experiencing the pain and discomfort of accelerated growth, and slaughtered while still babies. This is the reality of the meat industry.
Almost a month ago we launched our ‘month of glorification of the chicken’ in honour of world animal day. We asked you, our community, to answer some questions for us on life with chickens and share your stories, and photos. What fabulous submissions we have had. An outpouring of love and an important documentation of the intelligence and depth of feeling chickens are capable of given the opportunity. I have delighted in reading every submission we have received and we have had fabulous feedback from other people too.
If you have missed our posts, please give yourself a ‘feel good’ treat go and read through some of our posts. We received 29 in total. 2 shy of our 30 submission goal, and so yesterday ended our 28 days of submissions.

A BIG thank you to all those people who contributed to this worthwhile awareness campaign, and a BIG thank you to all those who read the posts and shared them.

April, Tiny, Buckeye, Bonnie Blue and Beep – a month of glorification of the chicken

beeppaints photo(14) photo(17) photo(19)

Hello my name is April.

I was a vegetarian for 20 years until I began to learn about the horrors of the egg/dairy industry, and decided to go vegan three years ago. Having chickens and realizing how they feel pain, joy, and sorrow greatly influenced my decision.

Where in the world are you?

Batavia, Ohio, USA

How many chickens do you have?

Currently four girls, three recent “rescues” that have their own secure private coop/pen, and one house chicken that I’ve had for 8.5 yrs. who is my heart and soul.

what are your chickens names?

My Barred Rock with cataracts is called Tiny, the red hen with one bad eye is named Buckeye, and my little grey crooked beaked girl is Bonnie Blue. My older house hen is Beep the Chicken, who has a digestive disorder. Beep has her own facebook page.

How do you spend quality time with your chickens?

Every morning I go out and feed the girls their treats and let them out of their coop, then I spend a good hour cuddling in bed with Beep. Beep pretty much hangs out with us all day, by the computer or in the living room. I don’t get to spend as much time with the other three during the week as I’d like because of my work schedule, but we let them free range and walk around with them to keep them safe, and they love to hang out with us in the yard on the weekend. All four girls love to be held, cuddled and pampered.

What has surprised you most about your chickens?

It amazes me how each bird has his or her own personality. They are little characters.. some are sweet and loving, some boisterous and standoffish, some bold, some smarter than most household pets, some a bit silly… yet they still share similar mannerisms and love of life and the of simpler things such as having a good dust bathe and preening…

What do you want to tell people out there (who don’t know chickens as a species) about chickens?

These birds have feelings, just as your family pet, or your child. To confine them to small filthy cages or cramped conditions to live out their life simply to provide eggs or meat to the food industry is a cruel injustice and abuse.

How do you know that your chickens recognize you over and above other people in their lives?

When our birds see us coming, they run to us. When they see others that they do not know, they run in the other direction. My house hen Beep knows myself (Mom) and her dad. She knows Mom is the cuddler and protector and feeder, and Dad is the one she bosses around and plays with. Beep is a precocious little girl who doesn’t like other birds or even other people very much. She would never dream of being a sweetheart to anyone except her Mom. When others come around, she is completely indifferent to them, showing no interest unless there happens to be a treat involved..

In your experience of keeping chickens as pets, what 10 non-negotiable factors do you believe need to be in place to give chickens a life that is physically, emotionally and mentally healthy?

For cooped/penned birds, I’d say the obvious – secure housing, nest boxes/perches, fresh water, access to food, protection from elements (hot/cold weather), social interaction – either with humans or other chickens, dust bath access, love/affection/attention, occasional treats, and medical attention when needed.

If you could say one thing, on behalf of chickens in the world, to the decision makers in your country, what would that one thing be?

First and foremost, chickens need laws in place for their protection. As a vegan, I’d like to see all chickens liberated – but as a realist, I know this isn’t going to happen in the near future. Most people don’t know that chickens aren’t even protected under any humane slaughter laws that are given to pigs/cows. Egg laying chickens need access to the outdoors/sun. They need more space in their cage than a space the size of an ipad. There needs to be laws in place to protect these birds from the cruelties we impose on them, but more importantly, there needs to be a way to ENFORCE these laws.

Join our FB community ‘chickens as pets not food – chicken rescue and rehabilitation’